Wednesday, May 23, 2012

The Bookstore as Lending Library and Showroom

Tony Sanfilippo is the marketing and sales director for Penn State University Press and he has a very interesting proposal for saving the traditional brick and mortar bookstore.  His proposal has caught the attention of Scott McLemee at Inside Higher Ed.  Here is a taste of McLemee's recent essay:

“Imagine you’re walking downtown,” he writes, “and you see a sign for a new business, That Book Place. Cool, you think to yourself, an idiot with money they apparently don’t need has opened a new bookstore in my community. I’m going to go check that out before it goes out of business. So you cross the street and walk in. In front is what you might expect, big stacks of The Hunger Games trilogy, a book of erotica for moms that appears to have something to do with the Pantone variations between PMS 400 and PMS 450, and a new cookbook teaching the virtues of artisanal water boiling.”

So far, so Borders (R.I.P.). Once past the bestsellers, you find an Espresso Book Machine, churning out volumes that customers have special-ordered. (In his post at Digital Digest, Sanfilippo indicates that three million titles are available for printing on demand, but in an e-mail note he tells me it’s actually seven million.)

That Book Place also has shelves and shelves carrying a mixture of new and used books, with price stickers giving the customer a variety of options. You can have a brand-new copy shipped to you the next day, or buy it used, or rent it, or get it as an e-book. If you take out a membership in the store, you can borrow a book for free, or get a copy without the Digital Rights Management (DRM) scheme that limits it to use on a specific kind of device.

In effect, the bookstore becomes a combination lending library and product showroom. “The books in the store shouldn’t be the focus of the revenue,” writes Sanfilippo. “Instead, the revenue might come from membership fees, book rentals, and referral fees for drop shipped new copies or e-book sales.”

People who take out a membership in the store would become stakeholders in its success -- not just customers, but patrons. Under that arrangement, Sanfilippo says, “a publisher might have a reason to trust the store and those members with DR-free files.” And the flexibility of options for acquiring a book -- whether for keeps or to borrow -- might undercut the consumer practice of browsing at a brick-and-mortar store, then buying online.

McLemee reminds us that Sanfilippo's proposal incorporates ideas used in 18th-century bookstores (books on demand) and 19th century circulating or subscription libraries. 

Read Sanfilippo's original post here.

2 comments:

Paul M. said...

That's a pleasant idea, but the lending library part of the concept seems unworkable as long as local and state governments back public libraries with taxpayer subsidies and even police powers (recent, extreme cases of sending police to retrieve overdue books).

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