Tuesday, April 15, 2014

More on "Is Blogging Scholarship?"

As my readers know, on Sunday I participated in a session at the annual meeting of the Organization of American Historians entitled "Is Blogging Scholarship."  I blogged about the session here. You can also read Michael Hattem's collection of tweets posted by those in attendance.

Today some of the bloggers from the session and those who followed the session via social media are writing about it.  Here is what I have been able to find so far:

Ben Alpers summarizes his panel comments at U.S. Intellectual History.

Ann Little has posted her comments here.

Chris Gehrz was not in Atlanta, but he was following the Twitter feed and this blog.  See his comments at The Pietist Schoolman.

Paul Harvey discusses the session at Religion in American History

I like what Joseph Adelman has to say here.  (And thanks for the plug).  A taste:

Other blogs don’t aim for “scholarship” in the narrowest sense (John Fea had interesting thoughts on how to construe the term) but do wonderful service to the profession by highlighting books of interest, topics that deserve coverage, and connecting history to the present. And some blogs do a little bit of everything. John Fea is my best example of this. In a single day, he will post interviews with authors and book reviews, highlights of research projects, notes about teaching, and Springsteen concert clips. Go ahead over and read The Way of Improvement Leads Home and then tell me how you’d classify it. I can’t—and I like it that way.

Michael O'Malley discussed the session and summarized his remarks at his excellent blog, The Aporetic.

And in case you were not in Atlanta, the OAH filmed the session.  I imagine it will be appearing soon somewhere on the OAH website.

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