Tuesday, June 30, 2015

The Astor Place "Bible House"

The Astor Place Bible House
Last week the ABS, for all intents and purposes, left New York City.

In order to remember this historic New York institution, we have decided to do a few posts on the various places in the city where the ABS was headquartered over the years.  Scroll down to see our first entry on 72 Nassau Street.

In 1853 the ABS left Nassau Street and opened its new "Bible House" on Astor Place.  It was a massive building.  It cost $303,000 to build, it was six stories high, and its brick exterior walls fronted four different city streets.  Much of the building would be used for the production of Bibles, but there was also office space for ABS secretaries and staff and additional space for the staff of other New York benevolent societies.  The ABS rented space at street level for "various business occupations."  The building committee concluded that the new Bible House was built to be "congenial to all who love the Bible, and in themselves a beautiful development of that Christian civilization and 'good will to all men,' which is the glorious offspring of that very cause under whose encircling influence they have found a home."

The impressive new Bible House became the center of print culture not only in New York City, but in the entire nation.  The building became a New York icon.  Over the course of the next thirty years it was a regular stop for tourists.  Mark Twain visited the Bible House in 1867 and claimed that he "enjoyed the time more than I could possibly have done in any circus."  Its size and facade sent a clear message: Christian civilization in the United States would advance, and the American Bible Society would be leading the way.