Tuesday, September 29, 2015

Let's Not Forget Pope Francis is a Latin American

Writing at The Anxious Bench blog, Gordon College history professor Agnes Howard offers a unique angle on Pope Francis's visit to the United States.  She wants us to think harder about the Pope's identity as a Latin American, his advocacy of Hispanic immigrants, and what it all means for how we move forward.

She writes:

First, American-history education should do due diligence to Spanish-colonial formation of many parts of the United States. Both in regions still distinctly marked by Spanish settlers’ experience (say, California) and those where traces are much fainter (Alabama), the period of Spanish presence should figure significantly in self-understanding. Part of the solution could be supplied by more robust instruction in state histories within U.S. history curricula. Another step toward getting our America right is the winsome approach of Felipe Fernández-Armesto, who demonstrates that Hispanic history is our American history.
Second, American kids should learn Latin American history, at least as a survey, at least for a year, because proximity, foreign policy, and culture make it useful to know.  Too many of us go about with woeful ignorance about our neighbors.
Third, the spectacle of non-Catholics cheering a new-world Pope should pique the curiosity of those unacquainted with the story of Catholicism and American freedom or insufficiently disgusted by the current of anti-Catholicism long in circulation here.  The influence of Catholicism is not only a nineteenth-century immigrant phenomenon but enters with the thirteen original colonies. That means you, Maryland, but also eighteenth-century Urusline sisters in Mobile and New Orleans, plus clusters of Catholics elsewhere in the colonies, often facing hostility.   Recent discoveries hint that there may even have been a Catholic presence in Jamestown.
Read her entire post here.