Friday, September 11, 2015

Studying *Breaking Bad*

I have never seen an episode of the television series Breaking Bad, but I hear a lot about it from Jim LaGrand, my friend and fellow professor in the Messiah College History Department.  When you mention the show to Jim, he gets a big smile on his face and proceeds with a small speech about the tragic dimension of life in this world.

Last year Jim and Messiah College librarian Jonathan Lauer taught a course devoted entirely to the show. This year Jim is at it again. The interdisciplinary course is titled  "The Wages of Sin is Death: Breaking Bad as the New American Tragedy." It even has a website!

Over the course of the semester students in this course watch the entire Breaking Bad series and read:

C.S. Lewis, Mere Christianity
Cornelius Plantinga, Not the Way It's Supposed to Be: A Breviary of Sin
Sophocles I: Antigone, Oedipus the King, Oedipus at Colonus
William Shakespeare, Macbeth

Here is part of course description:

A number of serialized TV dramas over the past decade or so have led many critics to call this period “the golden age of television.”  No show better epitomizes this label than Breaking Bad.  Its thrilling plots and cliff-hangers have won it millions of viewers.  But it’s more than a pop culture phenomenon.  Creator Vince Gilligan’s show stands out for its novelistic structure and sensitive examination of characters’ inner lives.  Even more remarkable for a television program, Breaking Bad provides a relentlessly honest picture of the human condition–both its vices and virtues.  The show’s depictions of the seven “deadly sins” or “capital vices”–especially pride, envy, greed, and wrath–have led many viewers to recall Greek and Shakespearean tragedies.  Acclaimed not only by the public but also by television and literature critics, Breaking Bad is uniquely well-suited among television shows for study and reflection in a classroom context.

You can see the syllabus here.  

Check out Jim's essay "Breaking Bad for Christians: A Morally Ordered Show."